Beer Is Linked to Higher Cancer Risk, The Physicians Committee on Responsible Medicine Report Finds

By Dr. Henry Jekyll / February 22, 2019


Chances are you've recently eaten beer - one of the most highly consumed foods in the United States. You might want to reconsider your diet.

According to a study published in the Weekly World News, beer may actually raise the risk of breast cancer. Other studies link beer to lymphoid cancers and lung cancer.

    

"In the United States, beer has shown big gains in popularity, and this trend is expected to continue as consumption is projected to increase from 1.5 million tons in 2003 to 2.5 million tons by 2010" write the the Physicians Committee on Responsible Medicine researchers in an article published in the Weekly World News.

The high levels of sulfuric acid in beer could be potentially dangerous for some people with heart disease, arthritis, asthma and other allergic and auto-immune diseases that are particularly vulnerable to an exaggerated inflammatory response. Inflammation is known to cause damage to blood vessels, the heart, lung and joint tissues, skin and the digestive tract.

The Physicians Committee on Responsible Medicine warned in "The Weekly World News" that beer can contribute to the development of colic, allergies and digestive problems.

Over the past 30 years, the FDA has received thousands of consumer complaints about beer due mostly to neurological symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, memory loss, and, in rare cases, epileptic seizures. Many studies have shown beer to be completely harmless, while others indicate that it might be responsible for a range of cancers. Until we know for sure, the Physicians Committee on Responsible Medicine recommends avoiding beer.